A variable-rate mortgage, adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM), or tracker mortgage is a mortgage loan with the interest rate on the note periodically adjusted based on an index which reflects the cost to the lender of borrowing on the credit markets. The loan may be offered at the lender’s standard variable rate/base rate.

In today’s market, the mortgage rate of a 5-year ARM is a 94 basis points (0.94%) lower than a comparable 30-year fixed. Rates for the 5-year ARM average 2.99% and rates for the 30-year loan.

5 Year Treasury Rate is at 1.57%, compared to 1.54% the previous market day and 2.80% last year. This is lower than the long term average of 4.00%.

10-Year ARM Mortgage Rates. A ten year adjustable rate mortgage, sometimes called a 10/1 ARM, is designed to give you the stability of fixed payments during the first 10 years of the loan, but also allows you to qualify at and pay at a lower rate of interest for the first ten years.

With the 5/1 ARM, any rate improvement would be realized within a year, when the annual adjustment is due. Of course, if the associated index was simply rising over time, it could mean a 1% higher mortgage rate year after year, pushing that 2.5% rate to 5.5% after three years, and even higher after that.

Bankrate.com provides FREE adjustable rate mortgage calculators and other arm loan calculator tools to help consumers learn more about their mortgages.

This table shows rates for adjustable-rate mortgages through U.S. Bank.. For example, with a 5/1 ARM loan for a 30-year term, your interest rate would be fixed .

15-Year Fixed-Rate Historic Tables HTML / Excel Weekly PMMS Survey Opinions, estimates, forecasts and other views contained in this document are those of Freddie Mac’s Economic & Housing Research group, do not necessarily represent the views of Freddie Mac or its management, should not be construed as indicating Freddie Mac’s business prospects.

Adjustable Rate Mortgage Definition Definition Adjustable Rate Mortgage An adjustable rate mortgage is a loan that bases its interest rate on an index. The index is typically the Libor rate, the fed funds rate, or the one-year treasury bill. An ARM is also known as an adjustable rate loan, variable rate mortgage, or variable rate loan.A variable-rate mortgage, adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM), or tracker mortgage is a mortgage. To apply an index on a rate plus margin basis means that the interest rate will equal the underlying index plus a margin. The margin is specified in.

Weighing a 5/1 ARM vs. a 30 Year Mortgage. Occasionally, rates for 30 year mortgages may be lower than 5/1 year arm pricing under certain market conditions. When this occurs, most borrowers would opt for the security of a fixed rate financing solution.

The 5/5 ARM presents a lower payment-change risk than a 5/1 ARM or a 7/1 ARM, but still offers lower initial rates than a 30-year fixed rate mortgage. However, borrowers who plan to stay in their house for longer than a decade will probably prefer the security of a fixed-rate mortgage.

5 1Arm The obvious advantage to the 5/5 ARM versus the 5/1 ARM is the fact that the mortgage only adjusts every five years, as opposed to every year after the first five years are up. With the latter, you still get an initial five-year fixed period, but then the rate is subject to annual adjustments, which can be pretty scary and potentially dangerous.1 Year Arm Rates 10/1 ARM – the rate is fixed for a period of 10 years after which in the 11th year the loan becomes an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM). The adjustable rate is tied to the 1-year treasury index and is added to a pre-determined margin (usually between 2.25-3.0%) to arrive at your new monthly rate.